The Parliament of Mongolia has approved 10 areas for national protected areas | WWF

The Parliament of Mongolia has approved 10 areas for national protected areas



Posted on 08 May 2020
The territory of protected areas will increase by 1.3 million ha, which accounts for 21 percent (32,891,617 ha) of the total land of Mongolia.
© WWF Mongolia
Parliament of Mongolia has approved 10 areas (5 new protected area, 5 expansion and upgrade of category) for national protected areas on 7 May 2020. The territory of protected areas will increase by 1.3 million ha, which accounts for 21 percent (32,891,617 ha) of the total land of Mongolia. The described areas cover 1.3 million hectares of eight provinces throughout the nation and 6 areas out of them are located in the headwater of the Amur-Heilong and Altai-Sayan landscape. WWF-Mongolia provided technical and financial support to the proposal, which will result in the protection of 1.05 million hectares represents the fresh water eco system, breeding area of multiple crane species, including the white naped crane and the run-off generating areas of Onon river.
We highlights only 3 of them in connection with the initiate on New deal for nature and people as follows;
1. Gutai and Khumul NP which is the run-off generating areas of Onon river, one of the only two sources of the Amur river. The Amur river is one of the biggest free-flowing rivers of the world – it is the ninth longest (almost 4,500 kilometers long) and has the tenth biggest watershed (nearly two million square kilometers). The locals are happy that the Gutain Davaa, which have attracted a lot of attention in recent years, have been taken under special state protection. Thanks to parliament decision gold mining stopped in Gutai gold deposit located in a territory of Khentii province and Onon River, head of the Amur river kept from the risk of pollution. If mining takes place at this deposit, risk of pollution and reduction of water level where thousands of people and animals live on it. This is an achievement only after over 12 years tireless effort of WWF-Mongolia in cooperation with other key stakeholders especially local communities. WWF-Mongolia has been actively involved in initiating this decision, where it was appreciated by locals. We had jointly conducted a broader set of preparation activities such as developing the justification for the proposed protected area, organizing discussions and consultations at local and decision making level, and conducting public awareness activities.
2. Two sites from the RAMSAR site have been included under special state protection. In particular, the Khurkh Khuiten river valley in the eastern part of the country and the Achit Nuur in the western part of the country have been included in the state protected area. In addition, the expansion of the Onon Balj national park to protect the Onon river basin, the source of the Amur river, will help improve its protection. Meanwhile, the Onon river basin is valuable ecologically and historically.
3. The newly protected Khomiin Tal national park is the third most important place for the reintroduction of takhi or Przewalski's horses in Mongolia. Today, the number of Przewalski's horses has risen to 89 in Khomiin Tal. The expansion of the Altan Khukhii nature reserve in the Altai Sayan ecoregion is an important decision for the protection of endangered wildlife not only in Mongolia but also in the world. WWF-Mongolia is committed to increasing the participation of stakeholders in the decision making process and contributing to the healthy and safe environment of citizens.
The territory of protected areas will increase by 1.3 million ha, which accounts for 21 percent (32,891,617 ha) of the total land of Mongolia.
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